Degradation Ceremony - Workplace Mobbing

In your experience of Workplace Bullying did you feel the perpetrator(s) singled out the target prior to the onslaught of personal attacks. Questioning a toxic culture is dangerous and can lead to personal injury in the workplace. It is reasonable to say that "communication" between persons takes place to single out and degrade a person in the workplace, usually to punish them and force them out of the workplace.


This is a brilliant article by Dorothy Suskind PhD,

The Degradation Ceremony: A Theory of Workplace Bullying | Psychology Today Australia by

Dorothy Suskind Ph.D

According to the theory of bullying as a "degradation ceremony," an individual in a group like a workplace may be abused and attacked for violating the group's unwritten norms; for example, whistleblowing. The pattern of bullying that follows is meant not just to quiet the victim, but to punish them and ideally force them out.

  • Research on such attacks finds that they can be traumatic for the victim, carrying a high psychological and physical cost, and in some cases leading to suicide.

"Conditions of a Successful Degradation Ceremony," in which he defined it as “Any communicative work between persons, whereby the public identity of an actor is transformed into something looked on as lower in the local scheme of social types.”


How Degradation Ceremonies Explain Workplace Bullying

Workplace bullying, at its core, is the degradation of a person with less power, per position or social capital, by a person with more power, with the ultimate goals of public humiliation, character assassination, reputational damage, and exile. As a professor and qualitative researcher, I have collected and coded the stories of 167 victims of workplace bullying across 8 countries, 31 states, and 24 employment sectors. The opening vignette of Glenda’s experience may sound extreme, but it is actually quite common across these stories.

Please read the full article by Dorothy Suskind PhD.

The Degradation Ceremony: A Theory of Workplace Bullying | Psychology Today Australia by

Dorothy Suskind Ph.D

This post is for informational purposes only. The content is not legal or medical advice. The statements and opinions are the expression of the author, and have not been evaluated for accuracy, completeness, or changes in the law. #inclusion#diversity#law#legal#content#women#safety#mental#health#bullying







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